Tag Archive wireless

GF Delivering 45RFSOI Customer Prototypes for 5G

GlobalFoundries’ 45nm RF-SOI platform is qualified and ready for volume production on 300mm wafers (read the company’s full press release here).  It was just at the beginning of last year that GF announced the PDK availability for 45RFSOI (we covered it here).  Now there are several customers engaged for this advanced RF SOI process, which is targeted for 5G mmWave front-end module (FEM) applications, including smartphones and next-generation mmWave beamforming systems in future base stations.

In case you missed it, at the Consortium’s Shanghai symposium GF’s Mr. RF — Peter Rabbeni — gave a great talk on the company’s RF-SOI capabilities, which are very impressive (they’ve shipped over 32 billion RF-SOI devices, after all). His slides from that day are available here on the SOI Consortium website. See his slide 12 for an indication of how 45RFSOI fits into the overall picture.

Slide 12 from Peter Rabbeni’s talk at the RF-SOI Symposium in Shanghai. (Courtesy: GlobalFoundries and the SOI Consortium).

As they explain it, next-generation systems are moving to frequencies above 24GHz, so higher performance RF silicon solutions are required to exploit the large available bandwidth in the mmWave spectrum. GF’s 45RFSOI platform is optimized for beam forming FEMs, with features that improve RF performance through combining high-frequency transistors, high-resistivity SOI substrates and ultra-thick copper wiring. Moreover, the SOI technology enables easy integration of power amplifiers, switches, LNAs, phase shifters, up/down converters and VCO/PLLs that lowers cost, size and power compared to competing technologies targeting tomorrow’s multi-gigabit-per-second communication systems, including internet broadband satellite, smartphones and 5G infrastructure.

Psemi and Anokiwave are among those companies at the forefront of 45RFSOI use.  Citing the drive to deliver faster, higher-quality video, and multimedia content and services Anokiwave CEO Bob Donahue said, “GF’s RF SOI technology leadership and 45RFSOI platform enables Anokiwave to develop differentiated solutions designed to operate between the mmWave and sub-6GHz frequency band for high-speed wireless communications and networks.”

The production line is in East Fishkill, N.Y.

GF’s New RF-SOI PDK Simplifies Design for Smartphones, IoT

GFrfsoi-icon-newGlobalFoundries recently announced availability of a new set of RF-SOI PDKs for the company’s 7SW SOI technology. GF, which has now delivered more than 20 billion RF-SOI chips for the world’s smartphones, tablets and more, notes that its 7SW SOI technology is optimized for multi-band RF switching in next-generation smartphones. It is also poised to drive innovation in IoT applications.

The new PDKs feature an interoperable co-design flow to help chip designers improve design efficiency and deliver differentiated RF-SOI front-end solutions in increasingly sophisticated mobile devices. (See press release here.) The new PDKs are designed to use with Keysight Technologies’ (formerly Agilent) Advanced Design System (ADS) EDA software, so designers can edit their designs in ADS using a single Si2 OpenAccess database without any interference.

“Our 7SW platform, with superior LNA, switch devices, and trap-rich substrates, offer improved devices reception, interference rejection, and battery life for fewer dropped calls and longer talk time,” said Peter Rabbeni, senior director of RF product marketing and business development at GlobalFoundries. “Our RF-SOI technology has gained significant industry traction for cellular front-end module applications, and the new RFIC interoperability feature will allow us to provide our 7SW customers additional design flexibility with a single PDK.”

China Design Conference (April 2016) Adds RF-SOI Design Track

EdiCon16EDI CON China 2016, taking place April 19-21 in Beijing at the China National Convention Center (CNCC) will feature a keynote talk by GlobalFoundries‘ Peter Rabbeni, Sr. Director, RF BU Business Development & Product Marketing. The talk, entitled, “RF SOI: Revolutionizing Radio Design Today and Driving Innovation for Tomorrow”, will kick off the newly added RF-SOI Technology Track. The SOI Track will also feature talks and workshops from Peregrine Semiconductor, TowerJazz, Simgui, AnalogSmith and Shanghai Jiao Tong University. The talks will cover substrate engineering, design enablement, CMOS power amplifier design techniques and highly integrated control devices.

Mr. Rabbeni’s keynote talk will cover how there has been dramatic growth in RF SOI over the last several years in its continued march in driving performance improvement, cost reduction and architecture innovation between the transceiver and the antenna in mobile radios. No other radio technology in recent memory has had the impact that RF SOI has had in this respect. With standards becoming increasingly more challenging and the pending introduction of 5G, RF SOI is expected to continue to play an important role in the development of innovative architectures. His presentation will explore where we have been, why and where we may be headed with this technology. Substrate engineering and SOI device technology is reviewed in detail in Microwave Journal’s October 2015 cover story at http://www.microwavejournal.com/articles/25255.

More information is available at www.ediconchina.com.

RF-SOI Pioneer Peregrine Introduces New RF Digital Phase Shifter

PSemiPE44820-WEB

Peregrine Semiconductor’s new UltraCMOS® PE44820 is an 8-bit digital phase shifter that delivers exceptional phase accuracy and high linearity for active antenna applications.

RF-SOI pioneer Peregrine Semiconductor has introduced the UltraCMOS® PE44820, an 8-bit digital phase shifter designed for active antenna apps, covering a 358.6-degree phase range. (Read the press release here.)

The UltraCMOS® PE44820 is a monolithic, digitally controlled product made for easy design-in and delivering exceptional phase accuracy and high linearity. Supporting a frequency range of 1.7 to 2.2 GHz, the PE44820 is ideal for optimizing the transmission phase angle in the wireless infrastructure and radar markets. It provides reliable and repeatable RF performance to applications such as antenna beamforming, distributed antenna systems (DAS) and phased-array antennas, says the company.

The PE44820 is also capable of extended frequency operation from 1.1 to 3.0 GHz for narrow band applications.

Samples, evaluation kits and volume-production parts are available now.

Toshiba announces new RF-SOI process and smartphone switch with industry-best insertion loss

Toshiba has announced TaRF8, the next generation in the company’s TarfSOI™ (aka Toshiba advanced RF SOI) process, which is optimized for RF switch apps. The first product to use the technology is Toshiba’s new SP12T, enabling the lowest-class of insertion loss in the industry. Lowering insertion loss is recognized as particularly important in decreasing RF transmission power loss, which in turn means longer battery life for mobile devices. Sample shipments of SP12T RF switch ICs fabricated with the new process will start in January 2016. (See the press release here.)

Designed for use in smartphones, the SP12T RF switch is suitable for 3GPP™ GSM, UMTS, W-CDMA, LTE™ and LTE-Advanced standards.

Toshiba develops high-performance RF switch ICs using its in-house fab’s SOI-CMOS technology, which is suitable for integrating analog and digital circuits. By handling all aspects of production flow, from RF process technology development to the design and manufacturing of RF switch chips, Toshiba says it can quickly improve SOI-CMOS process technology in response to feedback from the development results of its own RF switch IC products. This IDM approach allows Toshiba to rapidly establish new process technologies suited to actual products, and to enter the market with products fabricated with the latest process technology.

RF-SOI Roars Back into the Headlines

Articles about chips built on RF-SOI technology are back in the headlines. What’s driving it? Data – lots of it, and at ever higher speeds, finding its way in and out of your mobile device.

Bear in mind that we’re talking now about RF-SOI, which is not the same thing as RF in FD-SOI. These RF-SOI chips serve front-end module (FEM) functions, and are designed specifically for the special needs of getting a lot of data transmitted wirelessly, often over relatively long distances. They handle the back-and-forth of signals between the transceiver and the antenna. Today it would be practically impossible to find a smartphone that doesn’t have an RF FEM based on RF-SOI wafer technology. And the advent of 4G/LTE/LTE-A (and next, 5G) only serves to drive this market to new heights.

(In a recent ASN post, we explained the differences between RF-SOI and FD-SOI with RF – if you missed it, you can still read it here.)

By way of background, the current RF buzz is aligning with lots of activity on the world standards stage. The ITU (International Telecommunications Union), which sets time lines and processes, has just finished up its Radiocommunication Assembly (RA-15), where it approved the IMT-2020 Resolution, paving the way for 5G mobile systems (press release here). That puts 5G rolling out in 2020. If you’re really going to connect all the things in the big IoT picture, you’re going to need a whole lot more bandwidth.

But in the meantime, driven by video, even the current move from 3G to 4G/LTE-A is massive when it comes to what your mobile device has to handle. FEM designers are working all out to accommodate this, and new generations of SOI substrates are key to making it happen.

Check out this graphic from Cisco’s Global Mobile Data Traffic Forecast Update 2014–2019 White Paper, showing a CAGR of 57% in mobile data through 2019 – so this is in the 4G to LTE-A time frame.

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Cisco Forecasts 24.3 Exabytes per Month of Mobile Data Traffic by 2019 (Courtesy: Cisco VNI Mobile, 2015)

 

And the just-released Ericsson Mobility Report (get it here) sees a huge increase in M2M (machine-to-machine – an essential of IoT) and consumer cellular and non-cellular hitting the airwaves in the next five years.

EricssonNov15conndev

A connected device is “…a physical object that has an IP stack, enabling two-way communication over a network interface.” (Source: Ericsson Mobility Report, November 2015.)

 

So, new solutions are needed, and RF-SOI is at the heart of it. Here’s a quick round-up of important pieces you won’t want to miss.

Microwave Journal

MicrowaveJcover_RFSOI_Oct15RF-SOI was the cover story and in the technical features of the October 2015 issue of the prestigious Microwave Journal (click here for that October digital edition).

Just to put it in perspective, getting published in the Microwave Journal is a holy grail for RF engineers. For over 50 years, it’s been the leading RF and microwave technology publication, with all peer-reviewed articles. So for RF-SOI to take center stage there is a blockbuster – it just doesn’t get much better than that. Here are the links:

Semiwiki goes to GF

Industry guru Scotten Jones wrote in semiwiki.com about the key role of RF-SOI in GF’s strategy. This was gleaned from a recent trip to the (ex-IBM) fab in Burlington, VT. His wrap-up, GlobalFoundries Visit – Part 2 – Waking the Sleeping Giant (see it here) provides new insight into just how important RF-SOI is for the company.

The article contains a link to the slide deck of the presentation given to them by the folks at GF. It’s tremendous – if you’re at all interested in RF-SOI, you really should look at it. You can access it directly here.

As recounted in the article, GF’s Burlington fab has shipped more than 18 billion RF-SOI devices since IBM first announced the their RF-SOI process back in 2007. They’ve had more than 1450 tape-outs. The 60,000 wafer/month RF-SOI market is driven by tuner and switch apps. By virtue of putting these apps on SOI rather than using III-V materials, they reduce costs and are able to integrate key logic and control functionality.

(Source: semiwiki.com and GlobalFoundries)

Check out this GF slide showing the massive growth they’re projecting:

GF_RFSOI_SAMapps

(Source: semiwiki.com and GlobalFoundries)

And here’s the roadmap that says it all:

GF_RFSOI_roadmap

(Source: semiwiki.com and GlobalFoundries)

(Source: semiwiki.com and GlobalFoundries)

Elsewhere in the news, there have also been a number of new RF-SOI-based products announced. We’ll be expanding on those in the ASN Buzz, so stay tuned!

RF-SOI vs. FD-SOI with RF – What’s the difference?

Is RF-SOI the same thing as RF on FD-SOI? No, it’s not. However, the runaway success of RF-SOI and the growing list of recent announcements related to FD-SOI with integrated RF has lead to some confusion in the press and social media. The two are different technologies, addressing different markets, and built on two very different types of SOI wafers. The use of one technology or the other depends on the requirements of the targeted RF application.

For the non-technical reader, here is a bit of basic background. At the most simplistic level – RF: radio frequency – is part of the analog family, and as such is all about waves. And when you talk about waves, you talk about losses over distance (attenuation), speed, wavelength and frequency – which is why the RF design has a rep of being something of a black art. The distance to cover, the power envelope and the amount of data to carry over that distance (and of course, the cost) determine the chip solutions. An important part of the RF chip solution is the choice of the wafer substrate itself.

So here’s a quick primer to help sort out what’s what. Please bear in mind, though, that this is a fast-evolving world, so what you’re about to read is not a definitive and forever what’s what – but more of a general (and simplified) “this is how it is currently shaking out”.

RF-SOI – Talk to the Tower

When it comes to using your mobile device for data transmission over a 2G, 3G, 4G/LTE/LTE-A (and next, 5G) network, you still need dedicated RF front-end modules (FEMs). FEMs handle the back-and-forth of signals between the transceiver and the antenna. They contain multiple parts, including switches, power amplifiers, antenna tuning, power management and filters. Traditionally, they were built on gallium arsenide substrates. But more and more, the multiple chips in FEM chipsets are being reduced to single SOCs built on a special class of high-resistivity SOI wafers. This is the realm of RF-SOI. The wafers for RF-SOI are designed specifically to handle the special needs of getting a lot of data transmitted wirelessly, often over relatively long distances.

eSI_SoitecUCLwafer

Soitec premiered a radically new and immensely successful generation of RF-SOI substrates in 2013: the enhanced Signal Integrity™(eSI) family, which introduced the concept of the “trap-rich” layer developed at UCL. (Image courtesy of Soitec)

The latest standards (LTE-A and 5G) raise the stakes ever higher, requiring mobile devices to support more bands, higher frequency bands, and emission and reception on adjacent bands with downlink and uplink carrier aggregation. (Carrier aggregation refers to the simultaneous reception of multiple frequency bands to improve data throughput.)

For RF designers, that means choosing substrates that favor low RF loss and high RF linearity. A couple of years ago, SOI leader Soitec, in partnership with UCL, brought breakthrough RF-SOI wafer technology to the market (read about that here). Now, a few generations later, Soitec estimates that one billion RF devices are produced each quarter using their advanced and enhanced Signal Integrity™(eSI)wafers for RF. In fact it would be nigh near impossible to find a smartphone that doesn’t have an RF FEM based on  RF-SOI wafer technology.

Here at ASN, we’ve covered many of the leaders in RF-SOI FEMs over the last few years. Click on any of these names to get an idea of what they’re doing: IBM (now part of GlobalFoundries), Peregrine, SkyWorks, TowerJazz, ST, Qorvo, Sony, Qualcomm, Grace, Toshiba and MagnaChip. To learn more about the latest developments in wafer technology for RF-SOI, click here. With demand soaring, Soitec’s most advanced RF-SOI wafers are now also being produced by Simgui in China – read about that here.

In fact, the cover story and technical features of the October 2015 issue of the prestigious Microwave Journal is dedicated to RF-SOI – click here to read it.

So in terms of terminology, that’s “RF-SOI”. Now let’s look at how RF on FD-SOI is different.

RF in FD-SOI – for digital integration

When we talk about RF in FD-SOI, we’re typically talking about some RF functionality being integrated into SOCs that are essentially digital processors. True, you can integrate RF functionality into an SOC built on planar bulk (it’s generally agreed to be a nightmare in bulk FinFETs, though). But you can integrate RF into your digital SOC much more easily, efficiently and with less power if you do it in FD-SOI.

RF/analog has a (well-deserved) rep of being the most challenging part of chip design. Analog/RF devices are super sensitive to voltage variations. The digital parts of a chip, which have strong, sudden signal switching, can raise havoc with nearby analog/RF blocks. This means that the analog/RF designers have to care acutely about gain, matching, variability, noise, power dissipation, and resistance. They use all kinds of specialized techniques: FD-SOI makes their job a lot easier (good explanation in slide 8 here). What’s more, FD-SOI’s analog performance far exceeds bulk.

What sort of chips are we talking about? For now, we’re talking about processors for mobile devices, for IoT, for automotive, for consumer electronics. When we say “RF in an FD-SOI SOC”, we’re currently talking about chips that are connecting over a relatively short distance to a nearby box or device (<100m for local WiFi, or a few meters for Bluetooth or Zigbee, for example).

ST’s new set-top-box processors on 28nm FD-SOI (read about them here) are a great example. They are the first on the market integrating 4×4 802.11ac Wi-Fi (using IP from Quantenna) and High Dynamic Range support. This means the set-top boxes can reliably serve lots of HD video via WiFi to multiple users throughout the house (hopefully ending the cry: “Who’s hogging all the Wifi?!?”). ST credits their 28nm FD-SOI silicon technology with providing that highly-efficient RF, state-of-the-art WiFi performance and robustness required for reliable video delivery inside the home.

For RF on FD-SOI – as in other FD-SOI apps – designers use SOI wafers with ultra-thin silicon, ultra-thin insulating BOX and phenomenal top silicon thickness uniformity. These wafers are not the special high-resistivity wafers used in RF-SOI. Rather, they are the latest generations of the same (amazing!) FD-SOI wafers that Soitec introduced in 2010. (For an excellent, in-depth interview with the Soitec FD-SOI wafer guru on the supply chain and the most recent developments, click here.)

TopSiLoss_FDSOI

The top silicon uniformity of Soitec’s “FD-2D” wafers for FD-SOI is guaranteed to within +/-5Å at all points on all wafers. 5 Å across a wafer is equivalent to 5 mm over 3,000 km, which corresponds to approximately 0.2 inches over the distance between Chicago and San Francisco. That uniformity is maintained not just across each wafer, but from one wafer to the next. The BOX thickness is 10nm to 25nm, depending on the customer’s approach.

This is the type of wafers that GloFo, ST, Samsung, Freescale, Sony, several other companies in Japan and many more around the world are using when they say they’re doing RF on FD-SOI. Bear in mind that this level of SOC integration is fairly new (Samsung and TSMC just announced RF integration into SOCs for the first time in 2014 on 28bulk). But using FD-SOI technology and the corresponding ultra-thin SOI wafer substrates makes life much easier for the RF folks on the design teams, gets far better performance and far lower power at a much more attractive cost.

Further ahead, FD-SOI is also a candidate for transceivers and baseband/modem SOCs, which require high-performance digital and analog/RF integration. But even with transceivers on FD-SOI, you’ll still need the FEM on RF-SOI to handle the interface.

So, that’s the current difference between RF-SOI and RF on FD-SOI.

Hope that helps to clear things up?

TowerJazz and TowerJazz Panasonic Semi Co sampling best-in-class sub-90fs Ron-Coff RF-SOI on 300mm wafers for Next-Gen 4G LTE and IoT Apps

TowerJazz-TPSCo-300mm-RF-SOIGlobal specialty foundry TowerJazz and TowerJazz Panasonic Semiconductor Co. (TPSCo), the leading analog foundry in Japan, have announced breakthrough RF-SOI technology for next-generation 4G LTE smartphones and IoT devices. Through a collaborative effort, TowerJazz and its majority owned subsidiary, TPSCo, have developed a new 300mm RF-SOI process that can reduce losses in an RF switch by as much as 30% relative to current technology, improving battery life and boosting data rates. The technology achieves a record Ron-Coff figure of merit of sub-90fs and is now being sampled to a lead customer. (Read the press release here.)

It’s Official! GlobalFoundries Launches 22FDX: 22nm FD-SOI in 4 flavors

With much fanfare, GlobalFoundries has officially announced its 22nm FD-SOI offering. Dubbed “22FDX™”, GF says the platform delivers FinFET-like performance and energy-efficiency at a cost comparable to 28nm planar, targeting mainstream mobile, IoT, RF connectivity and networking markets.

Asked by EETimes why FD-SOI here and now, GF’s CEO Sanjay Jha responded, “The mass market is at 28nm/22nm. Really it is leading-edge pure digital that is the niche.” (Read Peter Clarke’s full piece here.)

And so a new paradigm is born.

With FinFETs relegated to the leading-edge-pure-digital niche, GF says FD-SOI provides the best path for cost-sensitive applications (which is everything else, right?!). Their pitch: 22FDX offers the industry’s lowest operating voltage (0.4 volt), enabling ultra-low dynamic power consumption, less thermal impact, and smaller end-product form-factors. Plus it delivers a 20 percent smaller die size and 10 percent fewer masks than 28nm, as well as nearly 50 percent fewer immersion lithography layers than foundry FinFET.

It’s been three years since ST announced (in June 2012) that GF would be providing high-volume sourcing for FD-SOI, but you never saw it on GF’s website — til now. As of 13 July 2015, it’s there in a big way. Today, you can finally go to the GF website and see the headline on the homepage, or find out all about the offer on dedicated tech solution pages (click here to check it out yourself).

GF_FDSOI_website

A snapshot of the GlobalFoundries website page for the new 22nm FD-SOI platform.

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Target apps for 22FDX (Courtesy: GlobalFoundries)

“The 22FDX platform enables our customers to deliver differentiated products with the best balance of power, performance and cost,” said Jha, who was on hand for the big event in Dresden, Germany. “In an industry first, 22FDX provides real-time system software control of transistor characteristics: the system designer can dynamically balance power, performance, and leakage. Additionally, for RF and analog integration, the platform delivers best scaling combined with highest energy efficiency.”

And of course it’s good new for the folks at GF’s Fab 1 in Dresden, in the heart of Germany’s “Silicon Saxony” region. GF’s invested another $250 million for technology development and initial 22FDX capacity there (that’s on top of the >$5 billion they’ve invested there since 2009). Further investments to support additional customer demand are planned, plus partnering with R&D and industry leaders to grow a robust ecosystem and to enable faster time-to-market as well as a comprehensive roadmap for its 22FDX offering.

If you read the ASN coverage of the FD-SOI Workshop during LetiDays a few weeks ago, you saw that GF’s 22nm FD-SOI has a 14nm front end and 28nm back end (read it here if you missed it before). At LetiDays, they also talked about body-bias “generators”. In the 22FDX press release they’re referring to it as “…software-control of transistor characteristics to achieve real time tradeoff between static power, dynamic power and performance.”

GF_FDSOI_FBBgraphic

GF slide from 22FDX launch shows the power of forward body-bias (Courtesy: GlobalFoundries)

4 Flavors

Here are the offerings in the 22FDX platform, each one targeting a specific area of applications.

22FD-ulp: ulp aka ultra-low power is an alternative to FinFET for the mainstream and low-cost smartphone market. With body-biasing, 22FD-ulp delivers greater than 70 percent power reduction compared to 0.9 volt 28nm HKMG, as well as performance equivalent to FinFET, says GF. For certain IoT and consumer applications, the platform can operate at 0.4 volt, delivering up to 90 percent power reduction compared to 28nm HKMG.

22FD-uhp: uhp aka ultra-high performance – this offers networking applications with analog integration the capabilities of FinFET while minimizing energy consumption. 22FD-uhp customizations include forward body-bias, application optimized metal stacks, and support for 0.95 volt overdrive.

22FD-ull: ull aka ultra-low leakage targets wearables and IoT. It delivers the same capabilities of 22FD-ulp, while reducing static leakage to as low as 1pA/μm (pA = picoamp = one million millionth (10-12) of an amp, folks). This combination of low active power, ultra-low leakage, and flexible body-biasing can enable a new class of battery-operated wearable devices with an order of magnitude power reduction.

GF_FDSOI_platform

Slide shown during the 22FDX launch summarizes GF’s four FD-SOI flavors. (Courtesy: GlobalFoundries)

22FD-rfa: rfa aka integrated RF and analog. It delivers 50 percent lower power at reduced system cost to meet the stringent requirements of high-volume RF applications such as LTE-A cellular transceivers, high order MIMO WiFi combo chips, and millimeter wave radar. The RF active device back-gate feature can reduce or eliminate complex compensation circuits in the primary RF signal path, allowing RF designers to extract more of the intrinsic device Ft performance.

GF says they’ve been working closely with key customers and ecosystem partners to enable optimized design methodology and a full suite of foundational and complex IP. Design starter kits and early versions of process design kits (PDKs) are available now with risk production starting in the second half of 2016.

What Customers and Partners are saying

ST: “GLOBALFOUNDRIES’ FDX platform, using an advanced FD-SOI transistor architecture developed through our long-standing research partnership, confirms and strengthens the momentum of this technology by expanding the ecosystem and assuring a source of high-volume supply,” said Jean-Marc Chery, chief operating officer of STMicroelectronics. “FD-SOI is an ideal process technology to meet the unique always-on, low-power requirements of IoT and other power-sensitive devices worldwide.”

Freescale: “Freescale’s® next-generation i.MX series of applications processors is leveraging the benefits of FD-SOI to achieve industry leading ultra-low power performance-on-demand solutions for automotive, industrial and consumer applications,” said Ron Martino, vice president of applications processors and advanced technology adoption for Freescale’s MCU group. “GLOBALFOUNDRIES’ 22FDX platform is a great addition to the industry which provides a high volume manufacturing extension of FD-SOI beyond 28nm by continuing to scale down for cost and extend capability for power-performance optimization.”

ARM: “The connected world of mobile and IoT devices depend on SoCs that are optimized for performance, power and cost,” said Will Abbey, general manager, physical design group, ARM. “We are collaborating closely with GLOBALFOUNDRIES to deliver the IP ecosystem needed for customers to benefit from the unique value of 22FDX technology.”

Verisilicon: “VeriSilicon has experience designing IoT SoCs in FD-SOI technology and we have demonstrated the benefits of FD-SOI in addressing ultra-low power and low energy applications,” said Wayne Dai, president and CEO of VeriSilicon Holdings Co. Ltd. “We look forward to collaborating with GLOBALFOUNDRIES on their 22FDX offering to deliver power, performance and cost optimized designs for smart phones, smart homes, and smart cars especially for the China market.”

Imagination: “Next-generation connected devices, in markets from wearables and IoT to mobile and consumer, require semiconductor solutions that provide an optimal balance of performance, power and cost,” said Tony King-Smith, EVP Marketing, Imagination Technologies. “The combination of GLOBALFOUNDRIES’ new 22FDX technology with Imagination’s broad portfolio of advanced IP – including PowerVR multimedia, MIPS CPUs and Ensigma communications – will enable more innovation by our mutual customers as they bring differentiated new products to the market.”

IBS: “FD-SOI technology can provide a multi-node, low-cost roadmap for wearable, consumer, multimedia, automotive, and other applications,” said Handel Jones, founder and CEO, IBS, Inc. “GLOBALFOUNDRIES’ 22FDX offering brings together the best in low-power FD-SOI technology in a low-cost platform that is expected to experience very strong demand.”

Leti: “FD-SOI can deliver significant improvements in performance and power savings, while minimizing adjustments to existing design-and-manufacturing methodologies,” said CEA-Leti CEO Marie-Noëlle Semeria. “Together, we can collectively deliver proven, well-understood design-and-manufacturing techniques for the successful production of GLOBALFOUNDRIES’ 22FDX for connected technologies.”

Soitec: “GLOBALFOUNDRIES’ announcement is a key milestone for enabling the next generation of low-power electronics,” said Paul Boudre, CEO of Soitec. “We are pleased to be GLOBALFOUNDRIES’ strategic partner. Our ultra-thin SOI substrate is ready for high-volume manufacturing of 22FDX technology.”

You might also want to check out GF’s 22FDX brochure (click here to download it) and watch their technical webinar: Extending Moore’s Law with FD-SOI Technology.

Choice is a beautiful thing, don’t you agree?

Peregrine Semi Introduces Industry’s First 300mm RF-SOI Platform

RF-SOI champion Peregrine Semiconductor has introduced the industry’s first 300mm RF-SOI technology. Dubbed UltraCMOS® 11, it is built on GlobalFoundries’ 130 nm 300mm RF technology platform (read full press release here).

The UltraCMOS 11 platform will be the foundation for Peregrine’s high volume mobile products and SOI products for other applications. It builds on the success of the award-wining UltraCMOS 10 technology platform, also developed and manufactured by GF, and offers unparalleled performance and cost-competitive advantages.

PSemi300mmUltraCMOS_11

Peregrine Semiconductor’s UltraCMOS® technology platform now includes 300 mm wafers. Pictured are wafers from the UltraCMOS 11 technology platform (left), UltraCMOS 10 platform and UltraCMOS silicon on sapphire (right). (Courtesy: Peregrine Semiconductor)

Moving to a 300mm wafer opens the door to new enhancements and advanced features in future generations of the UltraCMOS technology platform, which can leverage GlobalFoundries’ 300 mm production-proven design enablement and manufacturing expertise and scale.

“For over 25 years, Peregrine has been at the forefront of advancing RF SOI technology,” said Jim Cable, CEO of Peregrine Semiconductor (now a Murata company). “That legacy continues with today’s introduction of the UltraCMOS 11 platform, the first RF SOI 300 mm technology platform. By using 300 mm wafers, Peregrine ensures our technology roadmap will continue to be on the leading edge of RF SOI.”